Ashton Pointe Apartment Homes

100 Ashton Pointe Boulevard, Beaufort, SC 29906
Call: 844-820-6515 Email UsAshtonPointe.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P - 5P

$963-$1233

Apartment Homes Beaufort SC Blog

Beaufort, SC is One of America's Cutest Small Towns

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Ashton Pointe Apartment, Beaufort, SCEvery year, the best small towns in America draw tourists—and new residents—to their streets in droves. They are, after all, reminders of a simpler way of life, where mom-and-pop shops are the norm, everybody knows your name, and the pace is slower.

Beaufort, SC made the list of nine of the cutest small towns-- a haven to a romantic Southern getaway that feels untouched by time.

Beaufort, South Carolina

If this Lowcountry fishing village looks straight out of a movie set, that’s because it is: Beaufort was the backdrop for such films as Forrest Gump and The Big Chill thanks to its sprawling antebellum mansions, moss-draped oaks, and picturesque downtown streets.

Located on Port Royal Island in South Carolina’s Sea Island chain, the town makes an ideal base for enjoying simple pleasures and all manner of aquatic diversions, including paddle boarding, kayaking, dolphin watching, and crabbing.

For more information on apartments in Beaufort, SC contact Ashton Pointe.

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Renting in Beaufort, SC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Ashton Pointe, Beaufort, SCIf you’re thinking about moving to the Palmetto State, you’re probably wondering about the cost of living in South Carolina.

Rent in South Carolina

The average monthly rent in South Carolina is low compared to the national average. A studio apartment in South Carolina has an average rent of $1,078, $23 above the U.S. average. But, a one-bedroom apartment in South Carolina rents for about $170 below the average for the country as a whole.

What about two bedrooms? The average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in South Carolina is $280 below the national average. Three-bedroom apartments are even more of a bargain. In South Carolina, a three-bedroom place rents for $313 under the U.S. average.

There’s more good news for anyone planning to retire in South Carolina. The state does not tax Social Security retirement benefits. Plus, there’s a $15,000 deduction for seniors receiving any other type of retirement income.

Extras

There’s more to life than just the necessities. One popular extra expense in South Carolina is a beach. If you’re a nature-lover, be sure to take advantage of what South Carolina has to offer. Admission to Huntington Beach State Park is only $5. Caesars Head State Park is even more of a bargain, at $2.

Love zoos? You can visit the Greenville Zoo for just $9 or the Riverbanks Zoo and Gardens in Columbia, South Carolina for $13.95.

For more information on apartments in Beaufort, SC contact Ashton Pointe.

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What to Consider When Choosing Where to Retire

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 14, 2017

Ashton Pointe, Beaufort, SCYou may be focused on being near an awesome golf course, but your health and happiness will rely more on these key factors when you retire.

1.Housing

Housing is the biggest factor in most Americans’ budgets, by far. In retirement, especially, if you can eliminate a mortgage payment or rent, you can keep your housing costs from changing while your income is fixed.

Renting a home in retirement is tempting, and for good reason: In many markets, renting still is cheaper than buying a home.

Renting buys retirees the flexibility to move on a whim. It’s a more carefree life, with no expense or labor for home and yard upkeep. Leaky faucet? Just call the landlady. Let her deal with it.

Median rents rose more than 6 percent from 2007 to 2015. Increases may slow and prices may even stagnate, as after the Great Recession. But to be safe, renters should be ready for increases in costs.

2. Entertainment

“Best-of” lists of places to retire typically focus on college towns with an abundance of cultural opportunities, including cheap and free concerts, plays, lectures and visual arts. All great. But what if you care more about browsing flea markets? Or rooting for a major league sports team? First-run movies? Jazz clubs? Whatever is your thing, this is your time, so make sure your new hometown will deliver when it comes to your unique interests.

3. Employers

Employers? Sound crazy? Once, perhaps. But today most of us probably get it: Retirement often isn’t permanent. A survey found that 54 percent of workers age 60 and older planned to work part- or full-time after retirement.

Many Americans, in fact, cycle in and out of retirement. Some retirees grow bored and want stimulation from work. Others learn that their retirement income doesn’t stretch as far as they’d hoped. Or they lost savings or home equity in the recession. You, too, may want to work again after being retired for a while — and you won’t want to move to find it.

In addition to all that, a town with plenty of living wage jobs is a healthy, livable town with a strong economy — the best kind of place to live.

4. Excellent medical care

It’s self-evident, but it’s worth saying: Older people consume more medical care. And they often require care from specialists and facilities specializing in, for example, orthopedic care and geriatric care (and doctors who’ll take your insurance). Find out if your destination has what you need by talking with people and calling providers.

5. Proximity to your family

Being near family when you retire isn’t crucial, and it isn’t for everybody. But even if you don’t mind not seeing family members for extended periods of time, think about the fact that your children or loved ones may one day need to take an active role in your care, perhaps even becoming your caregivers. Great distances make caregiving stressful and often agonizingly difficult for adult children who are also raising families and working.

6. Public transportation

Younger retirees don’t usually give a thought to the availability of transportation. They’re accustomed to hopping into cars and going where they wish, when they wish. But that independence and freedom rarely lasts forever. If you intend to stay in a new community as you age, you may eventually want to use buses, trains, light rail, cabs and ride-sharing companies. Assure yourself, long before you need it, that your new town has plenty of ways to get around.

7. Assisted living, retirement homes and elder co-housing

It’s not a bad idea to pay attention to the availability of long-term care nearby. Nearly 70 percent of people who are 65 and older will eventually develop disabilities and 35 percent will spend time in a nursing home. A little basic research on the front end can help you make sure it’s a good one.

8. Social life

Talk with people you meet to gather a sense of how friendly the community is. If you are looking for a faith community, investigate the congregations that might appeal to you and attend services at several to test the waters. Ask yourself where and how you will make friends. Shop the grocery stores at a couple of different times of day and week to see if people are interacting or simply hurrying in and out. Try to pick up a sense of how warm and open to newcomers the town is. Even those who are not social types may be unhappy in an atmosphere that is cold, exclusive or frenetic.

9. Cafes, restaurants and gathering places

Where do people gather in the community you are considering? Try to look at the place with the eyes of someone who has just moved there: Visit the coffee shops, senior center, parks and movie theaters. If you speak a second language, is there a cultural center where you’ll feel at home?

10. Learning

One of the joys of retirement is having the time to learn simply for the fun of it. Make sure you won’t be stuck in a learning desert — and don’t make assumptions, good or bad, without checking into what’s available. If you have dreamed of attending classes and lectures and picking up new skills or honing old ones, find out what’s available. A quilter, for example, would look for a vibrant quilting or fabric store that’s a hub for workshops, classes and group activities. A busy arts center or arts supply store opens the door to classes in painting, drawing, fiber arts and photography. Look for a brick-and-mortar bookstore, a good sign of a community for people who like to read, think and discuss. Drop into the store and ask what’s going on in town, where book talks and lectures are held and how often. Visit a lumber or hardware store, poke around and ask people about woodworking or boat-building classes in town. A visit to the website of the local community college and other schools will give a sense of the classes, clubs and weekend events offered to community members who are not pursuing a degree.

11. In-home care

If you plan on staying in the community, it’s smart to look at resources you may need down the road. Ask realtors and others you meet about the availability of home health care aides. How many agencies are in town? Are their services highly recommended? What is the prevailing wage? Could you afford to pay it if you need help? Maybe it’s prudent to consider a less-affluent community where you could more easily afford home care.

Do you know where you want to live in retirement? For more information on apartments in Beaufort, SC contact Ashton Pointe.

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Money Talks News


Hurricane Preparedness for Beaufort, SC: What You Need to Know

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 06, 2017

Ashton Pointe, Beaufort, SCWith the potential threat of Hurricane Irma, many who live in our apartments in Beaufort, SC are asking, "how should I prepare?".

Although the path of Hurricane Irma is uncertain, it doesn't hurt to be ready just in case.

What should I do or get are the number one questions folks are asking in regards to Hurricane Irma.

It is certainly best to start preparing now instead of waiting until the last minute. For starters, you’ll need to make a plan for your family. There is a possibility that you may not all be together if something were to happen, so figure out how you will keep in contact with each other should Hurricane Irma affect our area.

Also, keep up with a list of numbers just in case you need to reach out for emergency help.

When putting together your hurricane survival kit, here are a few necessities you’ll need to keep in mind:

  • Water. One gallon per person per day, for at least three days, for drinking and hygiene.
  • Food. You’ll want to get at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food. Have a can opener for canned food.
  • Radio. Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert, and extra batteries for both emergency chargers and for mobile devices.
  • Flashlight and extra batteries.
  • First Aid kit.
  • Whistle to signal for help.

Emergency officials are keeping a very close eye on Hurricane Irma. If an evacuation order is given, you should heed the warning.

New advisories from the National Hurricane Center are issued several times daily. For the latest advisory, you can always visit our Hurricane Center online download our free WTOC First Alert Weather App on your mobile device.

If the order is given to evacuate, it is important to know where to go and what to do. If a storm is approaching and watches or warnings have been issued, state and local leaders will give an order to evacuate ahead of the storm. It is important to leave right away so you are not stuck in traffic. Often times the South Carolina governor will call for a lane reversal on I-26, which means all lanes will be turned into evacuation lanes heading out of harm’s way.

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wtoc.com



Ashton Pointe Apartment Homes

100 Ashton Pointe Boulevard, Beaufort, SC 29906

Call: 844-820-6515
Email UsAshtonPointe.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: CLOSED

$963-$1233