Ashton Pointe Apartment Homes

100 Ashton Pointe Boulevard, Beaufort, SC 29906
Call: 844-820-6515 Email UsAshtonPointe.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P - 5P

$963-$1233

Apartment Homes Beaufort SC Blog

Things to Look Out for When Renting an Apartment – Beaufort, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 29, 2016

Finding a cheap place to rent with a view might be at the top of your list when you start hunting for your next apartment — but there are other, more critical items you should consider. Here are 20 things to watch out for when apartment hunting.

1. A Boring Location

Dreaming of a move? You'll want to scope out the area before ever setting foot in a potential new apartment.

Location is key. If you're moving from out of town, often you take the first apartment you see. But do your research, and make sure it is a good personal fit.

Not sure where to start? Look up city guides to determine whether the area you're moving is near food and entertainment.

2. The Length of Your Lease

As simple as it sounds, some landlords will not clearly state that a lease is six or 12 months, unless you ask. In addition to asking about the length of the lease, ask what happens when it ends, and how and if you can renew it.

If you love your place and your lease ends, you'd hate to have to move because they put it back on the market without asking you first.

3. Regular Rent Increases

As much as your landlord might want you to stick around, your rent price isn't guaranteed if you renew your lease.

Make sure you ask about annual rent increases, which are typically based on property tax increases in your city. You want to be sure that your rent won't be going up by $500 after just one year.

How much your rent can increase and how much advanced notice your landlord is required to give you varies by state, so check your local tenant’s rights before you sign the dotted line.

4. Who Manages General Maintenance

Try to talk to some current residents about maintenance service, timeliness in response to maintenance requests, as well as the overall ease of living in the building. A simple question like, “Does it take five weeks to get your sink unclogged?” can tell you a lot about what it’s like to live there.

5. What Happens If You Break the Lease

It’s critical to know if and how you can break the lease, should the need arise. In many cases, job offers come or personal issues occur that result in a need to move immediately.

6. Unsavory Pet Regulations

Many apartments have rules about pets — if you can have them, what kind, how many, size and even breed. If the apartment allows pets, ask if you need to make an additional deposit, and how cleaning and repairs related to the pet are handled when you move out.

7. A Bad Interview With Your Landlord

Meeting the landlord? Come prepared. Of course, the landlord is interviewing you; but keep in mind that you’re also interviewing the landlord. The interview is a good time to bring questions.

For instance, you can learn about any issues with the property. Keep an eye on how the landlord responds to your queries, too. If they're quick to anger or seem aloof, you'll want to do extra digging to make sure you and the landlord will get along.

8. Damage From Previous Tenants

Protect your security deposit with a thoroughly documented walk-through of the property. Taking photos of the apartment before you move in and the day before you move out can protect you from illegitimate damage charges.

9. Noisy Neighbors

You might find the perfect apartment in an ideal location, but noisy neighbors can ruin the vibe of the place.

Be sure to go by the place you are looking to rent both on the nights and weekends. Some apartments are very quiet during the work week and become party central on nights and weekends.

10. High Crime Rates

Some neighborhoods seem safe, but what happens behind the scenes tells a very different story. Luckily, local crime rates are easy to access.

11. Unfinished Renovations

Sometimes, landlords will start showing an apartment in the middle or near the end of renovations. This can be a huge red flag.

Never sign a lease on a unit until it is move in ready. Once you sign that lease, landlords can sometimes become a little squishy on doing final repairs.” If you’re interested in an apartment with unfinished work, get any promises in writing from the landlord.

12. Dirty Floors and Dingy Paint

A messy apartment could be a warning sign to future tenants. When doing a walk-through, you should make sure the apartment looks like it's been cleaned and painted somewhat recently.

13. Mismatched Knobs

The doorknobs and light switches and little things like that should generally match throughout the apartment. A sign of mismatched light fixtures could be a sign of poor attention to detail and willingness to cut corners.

14. Past Lawsuits With the Landlord

Google the landlord. Many states have court records online so you can see how many times they've been sued to have repairs made or by tenants trying to recover a security deposit.

15. How the Property Looks at Night

After you find an apartment you like, drive by to see what it’s like at different times of the day and night.

Most people tour apartments on the landlord’s schedule, which usually means during the business day. But the place is very different on a Tuesday at 10 a.m. than it is on Tuesday night at 6.

16. An Absent Landlord

Whether it’s the landlord or a property manager, you want to actually meet the person who will be managing the property on a month-to-month basis. You can get a sense for what kind of person they are [and] how committed they are to managing the property well.

If the building owner only hires people to show the unit, that could mean they aren’t invested enough to either manage the property themselves or hire a dedicated property manager.

17. An Unresponsive Landlord

An unresponsive landlord could be a sign of trouble.

If the landlord isn’t great about returning your calls when they’re trying to fill a vacant unit, how responsive will they be when there’s a problem that costs money?

18. Community Events

Some apartment complexes have community events, where management organizes social events for the residents.

This could be a good sign that management is invested in trying to create a positive experience for the residents. You could always ask if the landlord/management does this, or knows of residents who organize events like this, since that usually indicates more camaraderie and goodwill between many of the residents.

For more information on apartments in Beaufort, SC contact Ashton Pointe.

#HowYouLive
gobankingrates.com


Renting is No Longer Only for Millennials - Beaufort, SC

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Renting is no longer a young person’s game. Many of those in rented apartments are over 46.

Many more ‘silver renters’ are over 55; similar in numbers to those under 25.

In the survey, a significant number of 18 – 25-year-olds claimed they were satisfied with renting, with and a large number want to own their own home in the future.

These numbers reversed for those aged 55 and above, with those saying they were happy with renting and only few saying they would like to own a house in the future.

The rise of the ‘silver renter’ may seem surprising, but increasingly thousands of people have turned to the private rental sector as the most convenient option available to them, following a change in personal circumstance.

Many of the younger tenants in our survey have aspirations to own their own home in the future.

Some feel that if the flexibility of renting can be combined with the stability and reassurance of longer residencies, and fewer restrictions around making the space ‘feel like home’, for many, renting would be considered a better long-term, as well as short-term, option.

For information on apartments in Beaufort, SC, contact Ashton Pointe.

#HowYouLive
Yahoo News


Benefits of Buying or Renting an Apartment in Beaufort, SC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 14, 2016

This is an increasingly common question in our financial planning practice. We find that most of the families we deal with think that rent money is “thrown away.” This belief is often quite wrong.

When you add up the cost of owning a property is at least eight percent of the total cost of the home. This is true regardless of whether you pay cash or finance the entire amount (if you use your own cash, there is an “opportunity cost” of not having it invested and making money elsewhere). One way or the other, you are laying out thousands a year to live in a house you own.

From a strictly financial viewpoint, if the cost to rent is less than the cost to own, renting is just fine. If you can rent that half million dollar house for twenty five hundred dollars a month (thirty thousand a year), you can assume the owner is paying you ten thousand a year to live in their residence.

A girl in New York City who is paying $2,400 in rent for an apartment that sells for over $800,000. That is a rental bargain.

What are the downsides of renting? Well, if the rental cost is more than ownership, it might be better to own (not always, see below). If you don’t want to take the chance of being forced to move, then renting may not be for you. Renters lose out on the appreciation of home prices. But we’ve seen over the last decade that residential real estate tends to be a lousy investment (even over the long run). Another downside is that rents tend to increase every year, whereas technically a mortgage should not. However, many mortgages do indeed increase in cost with inflation and time, and the other costs associated with ownership (repairs, maintenance, insurance, property taxes) inexorably rise.

What are the upsides of renting? Certainly the financial advantage discussed above. Another reason is that it gives you the flexibility of living in an area without being tied down. It is not unusual at all for a family to decide to live in a different town or at least a different area of a town after first moving there. Consider the value of calling the landlord when something is broken as another powerful incentive to rent instead of own.

The point is that we should not reflexively think that renting is a mistake. For many, it makes great sense. For more information on apartments in Beaufort, SC contact Ashton Pointe.

#HowYouLive
floridatoday.com


How Much Income Does it Take to Buy a Home? – Apartments in Beaufort, SC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 07, 2016

How much does it cost to buy a home where you live? How about where you're thinking of moving for a new job or school or retirement?

We don't mean how high are the price tags on the homes -- we mean how much income do you need to be able to buy a home.

The conventional wisdom is that you should not spend more than 28% of your pay before taxes. That works out to 36% of your net income after paying taxes. But what does that mean in dollars?

It turns out that the annual salary needed nationally is $52,699, as of June 30, according to HSH.com, a mortgage and consumer loan information website.

And the income needed to buy a home in the most expensive U.S. metropolitan area is nearly five times the salary you need in the least expensive metro area.

This information can help millennials, whose careers can be just getting started and who can be flexible in terms of where they live and work, and can decide where to look for a college education and a job. It can help Gen Xers and baby boomers plot career moves and retirement plans.

It's particularly helpful to learn how much housing costs in easy-to-understand terms, such as how much salary you must earn to afford to buy a home, on average.

HSH's number crunching is based on second-quarter median home prices, minus 20% down payment, from the National Association of Realtors and HSH's average interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages.

It’s the base cost of owning a home. That includes principal, interest, taxes and insurance. It does not reflect ongoing costs for such things as maintenance. For more information on apartments in Beaufort, SC contact Ashton Pointe.

#HowYouLive
investors.com



Ashton Pointe Apartment Homes

100 Ashton Pointe Boulevard, Beaufort, SC 29906

Call: 844-820-6515
Email UsAshtonPointe.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: CLOSED

$963-$1233